After all, SpaceX won’t need 42,000 satellites for its Starlink

The American aeronautical company SpaceX had requested authorization to launch 42,000 satellites for its global network.

Starlink will likely not need those 42,000 requested satellites to provide high-speed internet from space, according to its director of operations, Gwynne Shotwell.

“Obviously we want to launch more satellites, because more and more people want to use the service”, explained the director of the company of the American billionaire Elon Musk to some journalists. But: “I don’t think we’re going to need 42,000 satellites to deliver quality service globally,” he added. Larger satellites with longer antennas and better capacity, like the next-generation ones SpaceX is preparing to orbit Earth, will, she says, reduce the total number.

Congestion

The explosion in the number of satellites, more precisely at a few hundred kilometers in altitude, inspires fear of congestion in low orbits, as well as the multiplication of waste in space after collisions. Some astronomers also warn against visual pollution, which affects their observations. SpaceX has already launched 3,293 Starlink satellites and conducts about one launch a week using its own Falcon 9 rockets, to accelerate the use of its constellation. That’s how SpaceX launched another set of 34 Starlink satellites on Sunday with a Falcon-9, whose first stage was reused for the fourteenth time, for the first time, according to Shotwell.

The Starlink service, which began in late 2020, allows residents of areas underserved by telecom operators’ fixed and mobile networks to access high-speed internet. The service is also offered for commercial ships and aircraft, as well as small businesses. According to Shotwell, Starlink has over 700,000 customers worldwide, including 75,000 in Europe. And for the first time ‘this year our revenue will cover our operating costs’, he concluded.

Starlink likely won’t need those 42,000 requested satellites to deliver high-speed internet from space, according to its director of operations, Gwynne Shotwell. use the service”, explained the director of the company of the American billionaire Elon Musk to some journalists. But: “I don’t think we’re going to need 42,000 satellites to deliver quality service globally,” he added. Larger satellites with longer antennas and better capacity, such as the next generation that SpaceX is preparing to orbit the Earth, will, she says, reduce the total number of satellites, more precisely at an altitude of a few hundred kilometers, inspires the fear of congestion in low orbits, as well as a multiplication of debris in space after collisions. Some astronomers also warn against visual pollution, which affects their observations. SpaceX has already launched 3,293 Starlink satellites and conducts about one launch a week using its own Falcon 9 rockets, to accelerate the use of its constellation. This is how SpaceX on Sunday launched another set of 34 Starlink satellites with a Falcon-9, whose first stage was reused for the fourteenth time, a first, according to Shotwell. from areas poorly served by telecom operators’ fixed and mobile networks to high-speed Internet access. The service is also offered for commercial ships and aircraft, as well as small businesses. According to Shotwell, Starlink has over 700,000 customers worldwide, including 75,000 in Europe. And for the first time ‘this year our revenue will cover our operating costs’, she concluded.

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