The era of the American Inquisition, the remnants of startups and the “point five” selfie

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A fifty-year-old constitutional right has just been erased with a stroke of a pen by the conservative majority of the Supreme Court. Now, all states can decide as they see fit about the legality of abortion, and in this confusion there are already threats of criminal prosecution against women who resort to abortion. Texas confirms that two laws dating from the 18th centuryand century, buried since 1973, could come into force after the Court’s decision of 24 June. What are they planning? The stoning of the guilty?

In regions of the South most hostile to abortion, doubt and fear are already driving many women to try to erase evidence of their past wrongdoings. The street newspaper describes the frenzy of health app administrators like Flo, Clue and Apple to ensure the anonymity of information compiled into the millions of profiles as quickly as possible and render them unusable in the event of a seizure by prosecutors. And for good reason, in 2019, Missouri officials, particularly infuriated, admitted during a trial that they had all of the electronic data of family planning patients, including their menstruation dates. For now, anyone can still get this data from black market Internet operators – including the new American Inquisitors.

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memories memories

Yes, yes, I assure you: there is a poetry of failure, an aesthetic in the great disasters of business, if we believe in the prices reached on the Internet by the remains of failed startups. Count $220 for a plastic water bottle stamped Theranos, the name of the company that has promised to revolutionize medical analysis and whose former boss awaits sentencing after an anthology trial for defrauding its investors. The confusion confirms that workers made redundant during these disasters often leave masses of t-shirts, coffee mugs or jackets emblazoned with the house logo in their drawers, products of a thriving promotional gifts industry. These witnesses to the technology’s sometimes delusional claims may appear in the private collections of fanatical amateurs such as Christina Warren, who, according to NPRdid not hesitate, on the day of the abrupt closure of the streaming channel CNN +, in April, to ask on Twitter that we send him gadgets. “I will pay”, she wrote.

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beyond the grave

It’s new: Alexa, Amazon’s voice assistant, can also make the dead talk. CNBC I heard, at Jeff Bezos’s last re:Mars conference in Las Vegas, an engineering expert introduce a new program that allows Alexa to mimic any human voice very faithfully, including that of a deceased person for whom a minute’s worth of voice recording could be provided to artificial intelligence software. “We have lost so many loved ones during Covid, he explains. If artificial intelligence can’t erase pain, it can make memory last.”

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wide angle

the detectives of New York Times have spotted the new age of the selfie, so far, they swear, from the cute iPhone photos taken by stars like Paris Hilton and Ellen DeGeneres. Nothing to see. Gen Z no longer swears by selfie 0.5, “point five” for starters, taken with the iPhone 12’s wide-angle lens, which guarantees close-ups of grotesquely distended faces, but also offers a whole range of spectacular options. It’s quite an art: the lens is on the back of the phone, which forces you to photograph yourself at random, with comical or unexpected results. The new fashion would add a playful spontaneity, a mixture of imperfection and artistic research, to the narcissism of social media.

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miracle solution

The United States is spending lavishly on carbon capture technologies, touted as a miracle solution to global warming. Of the 27 largest such projects in the world, 14 are American and Joe Biden aims to establish his country’s prominence in this field thanks to a recent investment of $3.5 billion for four US airborne carbon recovery centers. but say Washington post, Scientific voices are being raised to criticize this policy, ensuring that the decarbonisation of the atmosphere would be better ensured by using renewable energy than by cleaning up CO.two, very expensive at the beginning and, above all, still not very effective on a large scale. And we found, ironically, that capture techniques were invented by the oil industry to extract carbon dioxide from oil and re-inject it into the wells to increase their yield. If this system is implemented in large American cement plants, at the cost of billions of dollars of investment, there is a risk of maintaining the status quo in terms of energy and blurring priorities. Instead of repairing the damage by capturing carbon, it would be simpler and more efficient to produce less carbon.

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