Disney, LGBT and the End of Corporate “Neutrality”

As everyone knows, the ideas and ways of thinking that are current in the United States, sooner or later, end up in Europe. Think of the MeToo phenomenon, for example.

It’s just a matter of time, but these ideas always end up reaching us, and faster and faster. Therefore, this column has only one objective: to show that soon our European companies will no longer be able to avoid the most lively and radical social debates. Business leaders think their role is to keep the “house” running; in other words, ensure that your cash is profitable, that you take good care of your employees, your customers and distribute dividends to your shareholders so that they are satisfied.

Of course, this vision of the company has been extended in recent years to other subjects, and so much the better. Companies today are concerned with gender equality, in particular through wage parity. Companies refrain from practicing racism through their diversity policy, and the same companies are increasingly involved in the fight against global warming. In short, companies are no longer interested only in profit, but also play their social role.

So far, I don’t know anyone who complains about it, except in the United States. The GOP is now waging a tug of war with large American corporations, which are accused of disregarding conservative values. The Republican Party no longer wants to give tax breaks to large companies it accuses of promoting progressive ideas, to the detriment of their own voters: be it, for example, these Texas-based companies that offer their employees reimbursement for their travel expenses. due to abortion in a neighboring state. Or if it is the Disney World company in Florida that is threatened, by the governor of this conservative state, of losing its tax advantages because under pressure from some of its LGBT employees, the boss of Disney (who initially wanted to stay well away from this whole story) has publicly committed to campaigning for the repeal of a Florida law that prohibits teaching sexual identity to children under 8 years of age. That is, the Republican governor believes that children under the age of 8 should not receive an education in which they are told they can choose to be a “boy” or “girl”. The Republican governor is furious with Disney for militating against his law and for threatening to strip Mickey’s company of all taxes and other benefits it has in Florida.

In short, yes, the company in the United States and Europe has become more committed, more social and, therefore, more political. As long as it was business parity or climate advocacy, there was a way to reach consensus, but with issues like abortion or sexual identity, the company finds itself, and will increasingly find itself, forced into debates that it would like to avoid at all cost.

If you’re wondering why Elon Musk wants to buy Twitter, you’ve got a first answer here. In my humble opinion, the company will no longer be the neutral space it was for a long time, it will become increasingly political even if it is against the will of its directors. It’s a matter of time in Europe, but it’s almost a certainty. And you, what do you think?

It’s just a matter of time, but these ideas always end up reaching us, and faster and faster. Therefore, this column has only one objective: to show that soon our European companies will no longer be able to avoid the most lively and radical social debates. Business leaders think their role is to keep the “house” running; that is, ensure that your cash is profitable, that you take good care of your employees, your customers and distribute dividends to your shareholders so that they are satisfied. to other matters, and so much the better. Companies today are concerned with gender equality, in particular through wage parity. Companies refrain from practicing racism through their diversity policy, and the same companies are increasingly involved in the fight against global warming. In short, companies, therefore, are no longer interested only in profit, but also in their social role. So far, I don’t know anyone who complains about this, except in the United States. The GOP is now waging a tug of war with large American corporations, which are accused of disregarding conservative values. The Republican Party no longer wants to grant tax breaks to large companies that it accuses of promoting progressive ideas, to the detriment of its own voters: be it, for example, these Texas-based companies that offer their employees reimbursement for their travel expenses. due to abortion in a neighboring state. Or if it is the Disney World company in Florida that is threatened, by the governor of this conservative state, of losing its tax advantages because under pressure from some of its LGBT employees, the boss of Disney (who initially wanted to stay well away from this whole story) has publicly committed to campaigning for the repeal of a Florida law that prohibits teaching sexual identity to children under 8 years of age. That is, the Republican governor believes that children under the age of 8 should not receive an education in which they are told they can choose to be a “boy” or “girl”. The Republican governor is furious with Disney for militating against his law and for threatening to strip Mickey’s company of all taxes and other benefits it has in Florida. In short, yes, the company in the United States and Europe has become more committed, more social and, therefore, more political. As long as it was business parity or climate advocacy, there was a way to reach consensus, but with issues like abortion or sexual identity, the company finds itself, and will increasingly find itself, forced into debates that it would like to avoid at all costs. If you’re wondering why Elon Musk wants to buy Twitter, you’ve got a first element of the answer. In my humble opinion, the company will no longer be the neutral space it was for a long time, it will become increasingly political even if it is against the will of its directors. It’s a matter of time in Europe, but it’s almost a certainty. And you, what do you think?

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