“In companies, open spaces are violent for humans” – Companies

Guest of our Trends Talk, Anouk van Oordt, founder of the OOO company, highlights how much we neglect the impact of layout and interior design on human resources. Covid started a change.

The interior layout of a company’s buildings and design are not details. Anouk van Oordt, a Dutch woman living in Brussels, is convinced of this. Graduated as an interior designer, she is also a consultant on new ways of working. Twelve years ago, she created her company-OOO, let’s say “triple O”-to supporting companies on the path of change, leading the way to a profound makeover of your living space. Because form unites substance, place unites soul.

A guest on our weekly Trends Talk show, which will be looped this weekend on Channel Z, Anouk van Oordt highlights the importance of working in interior design. Often companies have been very functional? “I think that’s still very much the case, she agrees. But the covid crisis may have awakened the need to reflect on the meaning of the profession and if we go back to it, what is the purpose, the meaning, the feeling, the type of office, its materials and the coherence of the whole. That there is a correspondence between what we say and what we do.”

Businesses are often set up in the form of an open space with offices in rows of onions and more than relative privacy. “Each one is assigned an assigned place, in silos. Pierre or Henriette are given assigned seats in blocks of four in open spaces, she laments. We don’t take into account what the person should do during their dayhe is asked to perform all of his missions from this same workstation.” This is a reflection of “Henry Ford’s old vision where everyone works on the assembly line”.

Furthermore, in the eyes of Anouk van Oordt, open spaces are simply “violent” to humans. According to her, we forget that tools have become extremely mobile, that we can work from different places, with fluidity and openness. OOO specifically wants to free the company from these shackles, to make the office a place where creativity is expressed. The philosophy of this Brussels company is to support CEOs in their desire to change their internal philosophy, embodied by the space. “It’s a long way,” she explains in this show.

The interior layout of a company’s buildings and design are not details. Anouk van Oordt, a Dutch woman living in Brussels, is convinced of this. Graduated as an interior designer, she is also a consultant on new ways of working. Twelve years ago, she created her company – OOO, shall we say “triple O” – to support companies on the path of change, leading the way towards a profound reshaping of their living space. Because form meets content, place meets soul. A guest on our weekly Trends Talk show, which will be looped this weekend on Channel Z, Anouk van Oordt highlights the importance of interior design work. Often companies have been very functional? “I think it’s still too much, she agrees. But the covid crisis may have awakened the need to think about the meaning of the office and if we go back to it, what is the purpose, the meaning, the feeling, the type of office, its materials and the coherence of the whole. That there is a correspondence between what we say and what we do.” relative privacy. “Each one is assigned an assigned position, in silos. Pierre or Henriette receive assigned spaces in blocks of four in open spaces, he regrets. We don’t take into account what the person has to do during his day, we give him requests to carry out all the It’s a reflection of the “old view of Henry Ford, where everyone works on the assembly line.” Furthermore, in Anouk van Oordt’s eyes, open spaces are simply “violent” to humans. According to her, we have forgotten that tools have become extremely mobile, that we can work from different places, with fluidity and openness. OOO specifically wants to free the company from these shackles, to make the office a place where creativity is expressed. The philosophy of this company of Brussels is to support CEOs in their desire to change their internal philosophy, embodied by space.“It’s a long way,” she explains in this show.

Leave a Comment