Attractiveness of companies: salary comes before sustainable policy among young people – Empresas

The 18 to 32-year-old generation considers a company’s sustainability policy to be important, even essential, according to the Observatory “Young people and the attractiveness of the world of work” by CBC Banking & Insurance. Attractive pay, however, remains the number one attraction for young people. Most are looking for meaning in their work.

For 70% of 18-32 year olds, a company’s coherent and honest social, economic and environmental sustainability policy is important, even essential. 81% of them believe that their employer should be committed or useful to society. First in favor of the environment (48%), but also against social discrimination and racism (40%). These are the conclusions of the Observatory “Young people and the attractiveness of the world of work” by CBC Banque & Assurance, which interviewed 750 young people*.

The study reveals a certain ambiguity in the relationship between young people and the sustainability of a company. Compensation remains the number one attraction for young people. That remuneration remains so important to them comes from the fact that they are in a phase of their existence in which they must build up financially. It’s the time of the first car, of the first real estate… and it still is. much more marked in this period of inflation and price increases, explains Marine De Ridder, researcher and lecturer at ICHEC Brussels Management School.

Trust, listening and solidarity

She continues: “Behind these numbers, there is a strong expectation of young people in relation to companies to engage in sustainability, but a difficulty, individually, in making career choices that contribute to a more sustainable society. In my opinion, this paradox is not specific to young people, but it represents a perfect illustration of our paradoxical relationship to the current environmental, social and health crises. We (almost) all want things to evolve positively, but few of us are really willing to sacrifice comfort (ie here, in the survey, in terms of pay, for example) for the benefit of these sustainability issues.

“Few of us are really ready to sacrifice the comforts of life for the benefit of these sustainability.

The CBC study also reveals the HR values ​​most appreciated by the younger generation. Trust (50%), listening (35%) and solidarity (32%) thus ascend to the 3 main human values ​​that make young people most want to work in a company. As for motivators to workyoung people mention above all money (56%), environment, environment and colleagues (40%) and personal development (38%).

The public service attracts

CBC increases a rather surprising result: the public service with a sometimes somewhat outdated reputation is acclaimed as the most attractive sector by young people. 17% mention it, ahead of the pharmaceutical sector (14%), the healthcare sector (11%) and the banking sector (11%). “ We see that these are sectors linked to the pandemic situation, we will have to see if this trend continues“, notes Fabien Claus, Director of Human Resources at CBC.

Most young people prefer a company with a flat organization that promotes collaboration and flexibility. © GETTY

As for the question of the attractiveness of a company today, several discoveries emerge from the Observatory. First, young people are more attracted to a local (37%) or national (36%) company than international (26%), unlike the other generations who had more career ambitions abroad.

collaboration and flexibility

At the managerial level, most young people prefer a company with a horizontal organization that promotes collaboration and flexibility (61%) than vertical (39%). “Young expect from a manager above all emotional intelligence and a feedback culture”, explains Fabien Claus.

The large companies of the BEL 20 appear in second place among the most attractive, followed, we are not within a large gap, for social and solidarity economy companies. Startups win only 14% of the vote.

The bad image of the banking sector

With these new parameters, the banking sector must also adapt to improve its visibility among young workers, emphasizes Fabien Claus. “He suffers from a bad image in the working world. Ten years ago, many graduates were magnetized by the bank, this is no longer the case. It is necessary to show how the sector contributes to society, guiding people or companies to invest in sustainability, for example. We need to take more risks with young workers, hire them based on profile rather than experience.

Distance and proximity in a post-covid world of work

The health crisis has also impacted 6 out of 10 young people in terms of their vision of work. Above all, making them want a job with a better work-life balance (31%), as well as a better salary (28%) and the desire to work in a more stable company (26%).

Marine De Ridder raises another paradox the relationship with work in a post-covid society. “At the same time, young people need distance and proximity to want to belong to a collective.”

With the new challenges faced by HR departments and managers who mustinnovate in the face of this new paradigm. “For human resources departments and more generally for organizational management teams, we must now try to find the delicate balance between these difficult-to-reconcile expectations. This requires thinking about responsible management practices that will allow us to be together, form teams, meeting everyone’s needs for flexibility”, concludes the researcher.

* CBC Observatory carried out by the Ipsos research office, in April 2022, with a representative sample of the Belgian working population, aged 18 to 32 years (750 people surveyed).

For 70% of 18-32 year olds, a company’s coherent and honest social, economic and environmental sustainability policy is important, even essential. 81% of them believe that their employer should be committed or useful to society. First in favor of the environment (48%), but also against social discrimination and racism (40%). These are the conclusions of the Observatory “Young people and the attractiveness of the world of work”, from CBC Banque & Assurance, which interviewed 750 young people*. The study reveals a certain ambiguity in the relationship between young people and the sustainability of a company. Compensation remains the number one attraction for young people. “The fact that remuneration remains so important for them comes from the fact that they are in a phase of their existence in which they must build themselves financially. It is the period of the first car, the first property… and this is even more marked in this period of inflation and price increases”, explains Marine De Ridder, researcher and professor at ICHEC Brussels Management School. She continues: “Behind these numbers, there is a strong expectation of young people in relation to companies to engage in sustainability, but a difficulty, individually, to enroll in career choices that compete for a more sustainable society. In my opinion, This paradox is not specific to young people, but it represents a perfect illustration of our paradoxical relationship to the current environmental, social and health crises. We (almost) all want things to evolve positively, but few of us are really willing to sacrifice the comfort of living (i.e. here, in research, in terms of pay, for example) for the benefit of these sustainability issues.” The CBC study also reveals the HR values ​​most valued by the younger generation. Trust (50%), listening (35%) and solidarity (32%) thus rise to the 3 main human values ​​that make young people most want to work in a company . As for the factors that motivate them to work, young people mainly mention money (56%), the environment, the environment and colleagues (40%) and personal development (38%). outdated, it is hailed as the most attractive sector by young people. 17% mention it, ahead of the pharmaceutical sector (14%), the health sector (11%) and the banking sector (11%). to the pandemic situation, we will have to see if this trend continues”, observes Fabien Claus, Director of Human Resources at the CBC. As for the question of the attractiveness of a company today, several observations emerge from the Observatory. First of all, young people are more attracted by a local (37%) or national (36%) company than international national (26%), unlike other generations who had more career ambitions abroad. At the managerial level, most young people prefer a company with a horizontal organization that promotes collaboration and flexibility (61%) than vertical (39%). “Young people expect, above all, emotional intelligence and a feedback culture from a manager,” explains Fabien Claus. large gap close, by social and solidarity economy companies. Start-ups won just 14% of the vote. Given these new parameters, the banking sector must also adapt to improve its visibility among young workers, underlines Fabien Claus. “It suffers from a lack of image in the world of work. Ten years ago, many graduates were attracted to the bank, it is no longer like that. We must show how the sector contributes to society, by advising individuals or companies to invest in sustainability, for example. We should take more risks with young workers, hire them according to their profile and not their experience.” The health crisis has also impacted 6 out of 10 young people in terms of their vision of work. Above all, making them want a job with a better work-life balance (31%), as well as a better salary (28%) and a desire to work at a more stable company (26%). Marine De Ridder raises another paradox of the relationship with work in a post-covid society. “Young people need distance and closeness at the same time because they want to belong to a collective.” With new challenges faced by HR departments and managers who must innovate in the face of this new paradigm. “For human resources departments and, more generally, for organizational management teams, we must now try to find the delicate balance between these difficult-to-reconcile expectations. This requires thinking about responsible management practices that allow us to be together, as a team, to the flexibility needs of everyone”, concludes the researcher. * CBC Observatory carried out by the Ipsos research office, in April 2022, with a representative sample of the Belgian working population, aged 18 to 32 years (750 people surveyed).

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